#math - Fri 11 May 2007 between 00:20 and 00:29

NY Lost Funds



Polytopehe's asked to use the derivative, so he should show that the derivative takes both positive and negative values
appletizerCicciuxLa, maybe upon retrospection it seemed simple :) but i can still remember struggling
lol
Polytopealthough that's an overly complicated way to do it
Eclipsoreverything in retrospect seems simple
:D
CicciuxLanope, I really enjoyed calculus...
appletizertrue :]
WILDSTYLEHi.
CicciuxLaanyway, using the derivative you would just get (cos(3x+2))' = -3 sin (3x+2)
chinoteach me something
WILDSTYLEchino, the rationals are dense in the reals.
chinoque passa ?
CicciuxLaand -3 sin (3x+2) and -3 sin (3x+2+2PI) have different signs, therefore it's not strictly monotoni.
chinogo easy
WILDSTYLENo.
CicciuxLachino: nada, por que? estamos tratando de responder las preguntas cuya respuesta conocemos, y preguntar o que no sabemos.
what do you mean by that WILDSTYLE ?
WILDSTYLEI was addressing chino vis a vis his request that I 'go easy'.
chinoCicciuxLa: estas ablando mucho rapido... que quer desir "cuya" ... "sua" ?
CicciuxLaI meant about the rationals being dense in the reals.
chino, you mean Hablando.
WILDSTYLEYou can always find another one between any two in |R.
CicciuxLaand cuya means whose
oh... I see.
chino"respuesta" you mean "requesta" ?
ahhh i see
your trying to respond to questions that you are familiar with
CicciuxLasomething along those lines, yeah.
chinoyea i dont really know spanish
appletizerhabla usted anglo?
:)
chinowtf is anglo ?
EdBoyanglo?
wtf?
chinovoce e un pocado maluco
EdBoyanyway
Eclipsorok, so now its the same question with x^3-6x^2+12x, I take the derivative 3x^2-12x+12 and since that's a quadratic function it's not monotonic since it isn't always increasing/decreasing?
and then it doesn't have an inverse function because of that also?
EdBoy((sum of 1 to infinity of (1/n)^(1/n))-1)^2 = 2

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NY Lost Funds