#haskell - Mon 19 Feb 2007 between 22:55 and 23:01

NY Lost Funds



kc5tjaWho said it did?
SamBand, back then, that market segment was using 68k
or earlier...
anyway...
kc5tjaI'd be happier with 68K, but that's still a CISC architecture, and prone to obnoxiously long instructions.
actionkc5tja grew up with the Amiga, and even worked for Amiga at one point. I know all about the 68K. :)
kc5tjagrew up with the Amiga, and even worked for Amiga at one point. I know all about the 68K. :)
SamBthey are all finite-length though
kc5tjaSamB: Bzzt -- nope.
SamBwhat?
which one is not?
kc5tja68K instructions are variable length, but in chunks of 16 bits.
SamBI said finite length
jcreighlol
kc5tjaI took that to mean uniform length (as with RISC).
SamBmeaning, as far as I know, there are no prefix words
kc5tjaBut Intel's instructions are also all finite-length.
sorear17/24
LoganCapaldo_> let fac n 0 = n; fac n x = fac (n * x) (x - 1) in fac 1 (fac 1 15)
lambdabotTerminated
LoganCapaldo_What, no get a calculator?
actionmbishop pokes sorear
mbishoppokes sorear
kc5tjaLoganCapaldo_: If I'm not mistaken, wouldn't 15!! = (15!)! ? Your fac definition doesn't appear to evaluate that.
LoganCapaldo_Sure it does
> let fac n 0 = n; fac n x = fac (n * x) (x - 1) in let fac15 = fac 1 15 in fac 1 fac15
lambdabotTerminated
glguylol, you might start a bit smaller
soreardouble factorial is NOT factorial . factorial

15!! = product [1,3..15]
LoganCapaldo_[1,3 ??
glguyhttp://mathworld.wolfram.com/DoubleFactorial.html
lambdabotTitle: Double Factorial -- from Wolfram MathWorld
sorear(at least that's what wikipedia said a few months ago)
> product [1,3..15]
lambdabot2027025
LoganCapaldo_:(
That number is far too small
sorear> [1,3..15]
lambdabot[1,3,5,7,9,11,13,15]
glguydouble factorial of an even number is product [2,4..n]

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NY Lost Funds